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LIVING PLANET REPORT 2020

Our planet is in serious decline.

The findings of The Living Planet Report 2020 are clear. It sends out the SOS signal that our relationship with nature is very much broken.

Like a medical report card where it reveals the health status of the planet, the report clearly reveals it’s in dire states. COVID-19 is the latest severe symptom of our sickly planet. 


Time is running out. We must take action now if our planetary health is going to recover.

DOWNLOAD THE LIVING PLANET REPORT 2020

We will send you the report and other communications according to WWF-Singapore's PDPA policy.

THE LIVING PLANET INDEX

Globally, the population sizes of mammals, birds, fish, amphibians and reptiles have seen an alarming average drop of 68% since 1970.

"The Living Planet Report 2020 is clear evidence of the catastrophic impact of human activity on wildlife populations and, as COVID-19 has shown us, the devastating consequences this has for our health and livelihoods. We need to take bold conservation action to stop and reverse this declining trend, and we have the opportunity right now for a green recovery in response to the current pandemic."

– Elizabeth Clarke, Conservation Director, WWF-Singapore

THE LIVING PLANET INDEX IN ASIA-PACIFIC​

The Asia-Pacific region is hugely diverse and has many unique ecosystems. Species populations monitored in the Asia-Pacific region have steadily decreased on average since 1970.

 

The most alarming is the average decline of of 84% in freshwater populations. There have been some positive signs since 2010 with increases in a few species of reptiles and amphibians. Other species, however, have seen an average decline of 45% due to habitat change, overexploitation and diseases.

WHAT CAN WE DO IN SINGAPORE?

We are calling for urgent action to reverse the trend by 2030 by ending the destruction of natural habitats and reforming our food system.

Want a TL;DR version of the report?

 

We have it! Download the summarised Youth version here.

VOICES FOR A LIVING PLANET

“Seafood is a very popular choice among our guests and the high demand, coupled with the sheer scale of our operations, puts us in the position to make a significant impact. Our partnership with WWF-Singapore helps us to lead the industry in championing responsible seafood sourcing and make a positive impact on the entire industry’s supply chains."
Kevin Teng is the Executive Director of Sustainability at Marina Bay Sands.
"There is a collective, multi-disciplinary approach towards otter conservation, with the involvement of NParks and the Otter Working Group. With local communities, the group monitors otter populations and movement in Singapore to resolve issues and protect the species."
The 'Sayang List' is a joint publication between WWF and Singapore’s National Parks Board (NParks) which aims to highlight 10 threatened species in Singapore that are currently under active conservation.
"Protection of habitats is particularly important in Southeast Asia, which is a global hotspot for biodiversity. However, deforestation in the region could be making the region more vulnerable to another outbreak."
Dr Helena Wright is WWF-Singapore’s Vice President, Sustainable Infrastructure and Energy Finance. She is also the Global Lead for Infrastructure Finance.
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