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FROM 100,000 TO LESS THAN 4,000

IN ONLY A HUNDRED YEARS.​

Tigers have gone extinct in Singapore, Laos, Vietnam and Cambodia.

Will the last tiger disappear from Southeast Asia within our lifetime?

What’s next for this endangered species is now in our hands.

Make a Donation

Help us replicate the successes of our tiger conservation efforts to the countries where it’s most needed.


Make a Donation

$88 can provide a month of essential resources for three Sambar deer, prior to their release into the wild under Thailand's translocation project.


Make a Donation

$288 can sponsor a ranger's patrol training course, equipping them with the necessary skills to protect forests and tigers.


Make a Donation

$688 can plant about 900 square metres of grasslands for habitat restoration in Thailand. That’s about the size of ten 4-room HDB flats!


Make a Donation

$888 can fund critical equipment sets such as camera traps and handheld radios which help to protect and monitor tigers.


Make a Donation

Your donation can help support our tiger conservation efforts to the countries where it’s most needed.


Select an amount to donate and help conserve tigers in Asia.
Input your country code (without the + sign), followed by your phone number
Input your address and unit number, followed by city and state (if applicable)
Input your payment card details here

Locked up in cages Restricted by chains Reduced to skins and bones

From 2000 to 2018, about two tigers were taken from the forests every week to feed the illegal wildlife trade.

These include baby cubs, who were stripped of their homes and family.

Tiger populations finally took a positive turn after a century of decline in some countries but tiger populations in Southeast Asia are still decreasing to dangerously low levels, with less than 250 in Thailand and less than 200 in Malaysia.

 

Nevertheless, it’s not all doom and gloom.

We know what needs to be done, and with enough resources and support, we will be able to replicate our hard-fought successes in Asia.

Tiger Light

Why should YOU care?

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While tigers are mighty big cats of the forest, they are extremely vulnerable to threats such as poaching.

 

Aside from protecting this majestic yet vulnerable species, tiger conservation brings a multitude of benefits for us that are too much to lose.

When we protect tigers...

We are ensuring that the forests they live in retain their significant role in capturing greenhouse gas and buffering against the impacts of natural disasters and climate change.

We are also protecting thousands of other wildlife species that share the same home—including elephants, orangutans, rhinoceros and more!
 

We are preserving an invaluable ecosystem for billions of people living in tiger landscapes—from clean air, freshwater, to medicinal plants ⓘ.
 

Tiger Light

A century ago, Asia had a robust tiger population.

Wild tigers even roamed the streets of Choa Chu Kang in the 1900s!

So, what exactly happened to tigers in Asia, and how can we help?

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Rampant poaching with silent “landmines”
Snares are one of the major threats to tigers in this region.

They are indiscriminate hunting tools set up by poachers which maim or kill any animals that activate them, injuring not only tigers, but over 700 other mammal species.

As of 2020, there were an estimated 12.3 million snares found in protected areas in parts of Asia.
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Driven to less than
5% of their homes
The clearing of forests for human activities has destroyed, degraded, and fragmented tiger habitats.

Logging roads also create easy access for poachers to illegally enter the forests, intensifying poaching.

Human intrusion into tiger habitats has also caused human-wildlife conflict—the very reason why the last tiger in Singapore was hunted down in the 1930s!
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Decline of wildlife populations in forests
The snaring crisis and habitat loss also threaten the survival of other species.

A healthy prey population is needed to support tigers, but natural recovery is often long for species like Sambar deer that breed very slowly.

In Thailand’s Mae Wong National Park, scarcity of prey has shown to hamper tiger recovery, even when the areas are well-managed.
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Tiger Light

OUR SOLUTIONS

More rangers, more guardians
In 2018, Project Stampede was launched in Malaysia, increasing the number of rangers who patrol, remove snares, and collect data on poaching. With over 22,800km patrolled on foot, this resulted in a 99% reduction in snares encountered, with 227 active snares deactivated in Belum-Temenggor, one of 3 priority tiger habitats in Malaysia!

Similar combined efforts with governments also saw an average of 17,200 snares removed annually from 5 protected areas in Southeast Asian countries.

Help us continue our efforts to deploy and support rangers in the field.
DONATE TO SUPPORT
Increase forest connectivity
Community efforts on restoration, protection, and management in Nepal have brought tremendous changes to the degraded area of Banke National Park, with tiger populations now flourishing. A 2018 survey revealed 21 tigers in the park, from just four in 2013!

In China, we have identified four habitat areas that could support around 310 tigers with effective conservation and interventions. Our restoration efforts are on the way to improve the habitat and corridors they need to thrive.

Help us amplify our habitat restoration works!
DONATE TO SUPPORT
Rewilding tiger habitats
Community efforts on restoration, protection, and management in Nepal have brought tremendous changes to the degraded area of Banke National Park, with tiger populations now flourishing. A 2018 survey revealed 21 tigers in the park, from just four in 2013!

In China, we have identified four habitat areas that could support around 310 tigers with effective conservation and interventions. Our restoration efforts are on the way to improve the habitat and corridors they need to thrive.

Help us amplify our habitat restoration works!
DONATE TO SUPPORT
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More rangers, more guardians
In 2018, Project Stampede was launched in Malaysia, increasing the number of rangers who patrol, remove snares, and collect data on poaching. With over 22,800km patrolled on foot, this resulted in a 99% reduction in snares encountered, with 227 active snares deactivated in Belum-Temenggor, one of 3 priority tiger habitats in Malaysia!

Similar combined efforts with governments also saw an average of 17,200 snares removed annually from 5 protected areas in Southeast Asian countries.

Help us continue our efforts to deploy and support rangers in the field.
DONATE TO SUPPORT
Increase forest connectivity
Community efforts on restoration, protection, and management in Nepal have brought tremendous changes to the degraded area of Banke National Park, with tiger populations now flourishing. A 2018 survey revealed 21 tigers in the park, from just four in 2013!

In China, we have identified four habitat areas that could support around 310 tigers with effective conservation and interventions. Our restoration efforts are on the way to improve the habitat and corridors they need to thrive.

Help us amplify our habitat restoration works!
DONATE TO SUPPORT
Rewilding tiger habitats
With a goal to provide healthy habitats and create an ecosystem that supports the recovery of tigers, 32 Sambar deer were released into Thailand’s Mae Wong National Park last year. The translocation project was launched after intensive research on the national park, which showed low Sambar deer population due to historic poaching and a lack of suitable habitat (such as grasslands and natural salt licks).

To support the rewilding efforts, we are also working to restore grasslands and create artificial saltlicks to ensure that muntjac, sambar deer, and gaur populations have vital minerals to grow.

Support our rewilding project to reverse the decline of tigers and wildlife!
DONATE TO SUPPORT
Tiger Light

The Tigers IN ASIA Need Your Help

Poached for illegal wildlife trade, hunted down due to human-wildlife conflict, driven into small fragmented homes with insufficient food… The tigers are fighting against all odds for their survival, and we can help change their fate.

 

Help us replicate the successes of our tiger conservation efforts to the countries where it’s most needed.

$88

Can provide a month of essential resources for three Sambar deer, prior to their release into the wild under Thailand’s translocation project.

$288

Can sponsor a ranger’s patrol training course, equipping them with the necessary skills to protect forests and tigers.

 

$688

Can plant about 900 square metres of grasslands for habitat restoration in Thailand. That’s about the size of ten 4-room HDB flats!

 

$888

Can fund critical equipment sets such as camera traps and handheld radios which help to protect and monitor tigers.

 

For other amounts, please select the custom option here.

 

All funds donated will go towards WWF-Singapore’s tiger conservation work under WWF’s Tigers Alive Initiative.

Tiger Dark

HEAR FROM THE FIELD

Make a Donation

Help us replicate the successes of our tiger conservation efforts to the countries where it’s most needed.


Make a Donation

$88 can provide a month of essential resources for three Sambar deer, prior to their release into the wild under Thailand's translocation project.


Make a Donation

$288 can sponsor a ranger's patrol training course, equipping them with the necessary skills to protect forests and tigers.


Make a Donation

$688 can plant about 900 square metres of grasslands for habitat restoration in Thailand. That’s about the size of ten 4-room HDB flats!


Make a Donation

$888 can fund critical equipment sets such as camera traps and handheld radios which help to protect and monitor tigers.


Make a Donation

Your donation can help support our tiger conservation efforts to the countries where it’s most needed.


Select an amount to donate and help conserve tigers in Asia.
Input your country code (without the + sign), followed by your phone number
Input your address and unit number, followed by city and state (if applicable)
Input your payment card details here

Tiger habitats overlap nine globally important watersheds, which supply water to as many as 830 million people!

 

And in India, ¾ of Soliga people use traditional local medicines from over 100 plant species in tiger reserves for curing minor ailments!